Early Pricing Details for Microsoft Dynamics 365 Reveal Incentives for Choosing Plans Over Apps

Early pricing details on Microsoft Dynamics 365 offerings emerged in the last day, and they reveal potential price points in US dollars for the Enterprise and Business (SMB) packages. Both editions of Dynamics 365 will offer both individual app and bundled plan prices, as well as light user price points for the Team Member level.

The first look at this information comes from a Dynamics ERP partner and is based on information shared by Microsoft with many partners on Partnersource and Yammer. The information was reportedly offered as "general" pricing, and was shared in the context of what some sources have described as a 170 slide Powerpoint deck with various pricing and packaging details and scenarios.

Microsoft has said it is not sharing specific pricing or licensing information at this time. A more public reveal is expected as early as next week.


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About Jason Gumpert

As the editor of MSDynamicsWorld.com, Jason oversees all editorial content on the site and at our events, as well as providing site management and strategy. He can be reached at jgumpert@msdynamicsworld.com.

Prior to co-founding MSDynamicsWorld.com, Jason was a Principal Software Consultant at Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC), where he implemented solutions, trained customers, managed software development, and spent some time in the pre-sales engineering organization. Jason has also held consulting positions at CSC Consulting and Monitor Group.

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Why NDAs matter

Jason, I don't fault you for publishing this information, but I do fault the partner who violated their NDA to reveal this incomplete and out of context information. Certain partners are brought in early, under NDA, to react to ideas that Microsoft is working on. I can tell you that there is a lot more to the overall story than what this article makes it seem like. When the full information is presented in Tampa, reader's perception will be significantly different than what this article, which is missing all of the context, would leave them with today.

NDA violators are great for reporters, but not great for Microsoft or its non-NDA violating Partners who have to sort out the out of context, and incomplete information with end customers. Personally, I hope Microsoft takes a hard stance against these saboteurs.