A One-Two Combination: External and In-House Training Vital for Successful Microsoft Dynamics GP Implementation

In a recent GPUG webinar, new adopters of Microsoft Dynamics GP revealed how effective implementation of Dynamics GP is highly dependent upon diligent, comprehensive, role-tailored training.

Participating in the user group session, "Currently Implementing Companies," a user working for a North Carolina city shared her successful story of utilizing both consultants and an in-house resource for training. While the consultants visited the 400-person organization for several days of overall training, the in-house resource focused on what the "regular" users need. 

...

Requires FREE Membership to View

Login
Become a Member Joining MSDynamicsWorld.com gives you free, unlimited access to news, analysis, white papers, case studies, product brochures, and more, and it’s all FREE. You’ll also receive periodic email newsletters with the latest relevant articles and content updates.
About Jared Berezin
Jared Berezin serves as a contributing writer to MSDynamicsWorld.com. With combined interests in technology and science, Jared previously served as a writer for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, drafting scientific narrative reports on the latest advancements in cancer research. Jared has also served as associate marketing specialist for International Data Corporation (IDC), a market research firm. In this position, he planned and executed strategic marketing initiatives for IDC's software and services research programs, and wrote outbound communications to the press, existing clients, and prospects. Jared also has experience working for several local newspapers in eastern Massachusetts. Jared graduated with honors from Colby College with a BA in English and creative writing.

Read full bio...

training must resonate

Despite monumental empirical evidence documenting the importance of thorough, individualized training, many companies still ignore it as much as possible. In reality, effective group and individual accounting software training can be the most important factor in the success or failure of an accounting software implementation. It must be much more than perfunctory. It must resonate with its audience. It must occur in a way where users can safely make mistakes, comfortably practice, and confidently gain proficiency. Implementing new accounting solutions without adequate training is akin to letting a tiger out of its cage without having a trainer present. You’ll get results, but probably not the ones you would like. Paul Farrell, CEO, Wizard Productivity Systems LP; pfarrell@wizardus.com

minivan